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We’re counting down to our annual orgy of authorship, when we invite you to write that book.

Lots of good stuff this month. Adam Goucher on automation, Jeff Cohen on developer community values, Tim Ottinger and Jeff Langr on distributed computing, and Dan Wohlbruck on tech history. Venkat Subramaniam continues his series on the Scala language. John Shade has a little list. And in the latest installment of our series of staff profiles, you get to meet another member of our team.

You’ll find something of interest in this issue, I’m sure. But now let me tell you about a little program we’ve got going on next month.

We call it PragProWriMo, short for Pragmatic Programmers Writing Month, and this November will be our third PragProWriMo. We were inspired by (we ripped off) NaNoWriMo, National Novel Writing Month.

PragProWriMo is all about helping you write that technical book you’d really like to write but for some reason haven’t been able to get started.

We’ll provide supporting materials and encouragement and all you have to do is to write 60 pages toward that book during the month of November.

To help you along, we’re setting up a forum and a Twitter account. Follow us on Twitter at @pragprowrimo to stay up to date. Join the forum at forums.pragprog.com/forums/190 for more detailed writing advice, answers to your writing questions, and progress reports from participants. And when you finish your 60 pages, you might even get some special recognition from us.

And of course we’d love for you to submit a proposal for that book to us. But it’s your work. You can publish it for free, you can do print on demand, you can hide it from the world and keep it to yourself, or you can take it to another publisher. What we’re really trying to do is to help you write the book you’ve always wanted to write.