merged v9 and v10 following a concurrent revert war. please remove this comment on next edit

  • Object Pascal / Delphi – Pascal was originally a learning language. Turbo Pascal is an important part of programming history. Further, Anders Hejlsberg led the language development of Delphi and then went on to create C# which, despite being very different from Delphi was heavily influenced by it.
  • Haskell – Pure & Lazy functional programming language which has directly and indirectly influenced many languages. As opposed to imperative languages, functional languages require a paradigm shift in thinking and hence will influence the way we code in our current/favorite language. Features like STM, statelessness, Monads and many others make it a must learn programming language, especially with multi-cores on the rise.
  • Groovy – A powerful dynamic language for the JVM. It has the lowest barrier to entry for the millions of existing Java developers and acts as a gateway to other dynamic and functional languages, in that it opens peoples eyes to this new world of alternative languages. If I hadn’t learned Groovy, I wouldn’t be trying to learn Clojure now.
  • Actionscript 3—Modular language like javascript (but much more advanced) based on ECMAScript growing in popularity and getting more popular everyday
  • Clojure—it’s like Lisp, only better
  • Factor—a stack-based language for the new millennium
  • Haskell—Static Typing as if you meant it and functional programming at its purest
  • Javascript—runs in more places than any other language
  • Python—mature, simple, defacto scripting language of the future
  • Scala—all the buzz at JavaCon this year
  • Erlang—concurrency made easy
  • E—understanding object-capability will transform how you think about safety v.s. power
  • Prolog—it’ll blow your mind (if you can understand it)
  • Lua—JavaScript competitor in game sector
  • Common Lisp—everything since copies some of its best ideas
  • Objective-C—C with s-expressions and the object-model is so much like Ruby
  • Forth—Stack-based functional language
  • AppleScript—equal parts fun & frustrating, mysterious scoping, and rules that bend with every application
  • C—because we all know what’s in the books, but in the real world it always looks WAY different
  • Perl—the camel’s back has yet to be broken
  • COBOL—all caps all the time
  • OCaml
  • Ruby—Simple and elegant, the way O-O was meant to be
  • F#—functional and OO on the CLR. OCaml derivative for .NET “corporate” programmer types

Are we assuming that the audience already knows C, Java (or C#), and Ruby?

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